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Messages: Books by authors of color: Recommendations
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Barbara Neely

Has anyone read the Blanche series by Barbara Neely? I am intrigued after seeing this blog post on the series: http://laurietobyedison.com/discuss/?p=5525 and would love to hear other opinions.

Kerry
3 years ago
5 comments

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(2 years ago)Updating this thread a bit, I have now read all but one of the Blanche series (Blanche Cleans Up is my favorite so far) and I have to say I am really torn about the last one. One the one hand, I can't wait to read it. On the other, once I have read it there are no more. I wish there were more.
Kerry
(2 years ago)Robin, my apologies, your comment seems out of context in this thread since I moved the original comment about Octavia Butler into it's own thread. I didn't realize that I couldn't move the comment along with it. My bad.
Kerry
(2 years ago)Sadly, "was" gifted. We lost her too soon.
Robin
(3 years ago)Same here, I just finished "Blanche on the Lam" and it was very enjoyable!
Kerry
(3 years ago)I read the first one "Blanche on the Lam" and liked it very much. It seems to be fairly easy to find. The others in the series not so much, but I keep looking for them. Robin
Robin
Octavia Butler

Octavia Butler is the first African American author honored with awards for her science fiction writing. She is gifted.

Nancy Johnson
2 years ago
1 comment

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(2 years ago)I only very recently got around to reading Kindred and I was completely blown away. What a wonderful book.
Kerry
Anything by Walter Mosley

His books are amazing. I really enjoyed reading them all. One of his book was actually made into a movie, "The Devil In a Blue Dress" with Denzel Washington.

Mosley's mysteries deals with issues of race, class, and gender from a black man's point view. I really like the way he describe the surroundings, the setup of the story line which within minutes of reading would grip readers attention.

ch817t
4 years ago
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No Matter What: 9 Steps to Achieving your life by Lisa Nichols

I would recommend this for anyone who is "stuck" in life. Lisa has an amazing ability to tell her story and provide advice in a way that you can relate to it, and take action. It would be a particularly good book to share to a young person who is searching for answers.

Ann Snyder
4 years ago
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Lawrence Hill

I have to recommend "The Book of Negroes" by Lawrence Hill (I think it was published as "Someone Knows My Name" in the US). Aminata Diallo is a Muslim girl who is captured as a slave and shipped to the US. She journeys up to Canada and returns to Africa. Although her story is at times a little too much to believe, the fiction and storytelling sweep you away. I couldn't put the book down.

Shawna
4 years ago
1 comment

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(4 years ago)Reading it right now, so far I definitely love it.
Marina Bonomi
The Other Wes Moore

I recently finished "The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates" by Wes Moore and I highly recommend it. It has some very profound things to say about expectations that we have for ourselves and that others have for us as we are growing up.

Wes Moore (Author) : The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates [Hardcover]

Kerry
4 years ago
1 comment

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(4 years ago)I bought this for my father for father's day this year and he loved it. He's a quiet man and I'd never heard him so excited about a book before. He said it was one of the best books on being an african-american male he'd ever read.
ShanaM
Samuel R. Delany

Delany's science fiction deals with issues of race, class and gender in innovative ways. He also has a knack for making linguistic issues into gripping narrative. I especially like his novelette Babel-17, about a poet conscripted into cracking a secret alien language.

M
4 years ago
no comments

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Carl Weber

I enjoy the writings of Carl Weber. His books are fast-paced and true to life. They are usually quick reads!!!

apastrana78
4 years ago
2 comments

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(4 years ago)I have read all but his last two books. I am working on that now!!! No I haven't read Colin channer but will look him up!!!!
apastrana78
(4 years ago)Did you like Married Men? ( I believe that is somewhere in my home.) Also, are you familiar with Colin Channer? He wrote a novel called Waiting in Vain, published by Ballantine Books, sometime in the mid to late nineties.
ladykhalia
Edward P. Jones

I was totally captivated listening to "Lost in the City" - (fictional) tales of folks in current-day Washington, D. C.

John98109
4 years ago
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Toni Morrison

Not sure we can call this a thread of great authors much less authors of color if we don't mention Toni Morrison who is considered by many to be the greatest living novelist... at minimum, probably the greatest living American novelist. And this is coming from someone who doesn't have an African American ancestry.

The depth and texture of her work can be very intense at times.. perhaps even exhausting (so no, probably not a light read for the beach) but at the same time... the biggest problem with reading her book at the beach is that you'd get so involved that you'd end up forgetting you were sunning and end up with a burn.

But then, I don't guess the great authors are known for being 'light reads'.

Julie Hensley
4 years ago
1 comment

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(4 years ago)Yes, great authors are VERY heavy. I was completely lost when I read The Bluest Eyes and Beloved. Maybe I was too young or it may have been too detailed, but I just didn't "get it". I didn't get the greatness of her writing. Alice Walker is another good one.
lizamichelle1
Tananarive Due (African American)

She is a supernatural author. She has a short story in an anthology called The Ancestors with LA Banks & Brandon Massey (2 other African American authors).

I am currently reading Joplin's Ghost, about a woman being haunted by the great ragtime composer Scott Joplin. Look up the ragtime song "The Entertainer" and you'll be surprise that it was written by an African American, if you didn't already know.

lizamichelle1
4 years ago
4 comments

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(4 years ago)I've just started reading Tananarive. I never knew she was out there. I only know of Octavia Butler; i think she wrote a lot of sci-fi - not my favorite. But I did enjoy Kindred. I have to get my copy back from my friend before she misplaces it lol.
lizamichelle1
(4 years ago)Has anyone read "Freedom in the Family: A Mother-Daughter Memoir of the Fight for Civil Rights"? Tananarive Due : Freedom in the Family: A Mother-Daughter Memoir of the Fight for Civil Rights
Kerry
(4 years ago)All books by Virginia Derberry and Donna Grant They are so good !
chynadoll42726
(4 years ago)Heartily seconded -- I adore Due's work. Her "African Immortals" series in particular is one of the most original takes on a vampire mythos I've ever seen: if you like vamp books but find a lot of the current paranormals a little tiresome because they don't bring anything new and different to the table, give Tananarive Due : My Soul to Keep a try. Also, while most of her work has been on the horror/paranormal side, she does write outside of this genre as well; Tananarive Due : The Black Rose: The Dramatic Story of Madam C.J. Walker, America's First Black Female Millionaire is a historical novel about the famous entrepeneur Madame Walker, and the "Tennyson Hardwick" mysteries are collaborations between Due, her husband Steven Barnes, and actor Blair Underwood.
Miss Smilla
Keeper of Secrets... Translations of an Incident by Anjuelle Floyd

Keeper of Secrets... Translations of an Incident is composed of eight short stories united by strong characters and revolving around one central incident. The stories are each told from a different point of view and reveal how the central incident affects the lives of the witnesses and even of people who were not present during the incident - like the ripples made by a stone as it impacts the water in a still pond.

http://www.librarything.com/work/4891503

Joan M.
4 years ago
3 comments

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(4 years ago)You're welcome.
Joan M.
(4 years ago)This description sounds like an episode of Grey's Anatomy when the chief and the hospital board asked everyone about the death of a seemingly well woman. This I will add to my save list.
lizamichelle1
(4 years ago)Thanks! I have added this to my wishlist!
Kerry
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

This is a new book, and the first in a trilogy. Captivating fantasy set in a rich and disturbing new world. I found this novel captivating from beginning to end.

Kerry
4 years ago
no comments

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